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Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed Review

Akiba’s Trip Undead & Undressed (1)

When visitors come to Los Angeles for the first time, their expectations of the city are often influenced by media. Quite often, they’ll are a bit surprised that the town doesn’t offer a non-stop cavalcade of exotic sports cars and celebrities, mixed in with the occasional outburst of gang warfare. Similarly, recent release Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed paints a fantastic portrait of Tokyo’s Akihabara district. Coming into prominence as the capital’s post-war hub for consumer electronics, “Electric Town” has more recently transformed into a must-visit mecca for otaku, offering a labyrinthine network of game, manga, and anime stores.

Much like the games which depict the City of Angels, Akiba’s Trip nails both the architecture and overall layout of Akihabara. Anyone familiar with the district likely won’t have to open the in-game map to navigate their way around. Certainly, the title conveys verisimilitude, with a purported roster of over 130 actual stores allowing their likeness and location to be used in the title. Fittingly, ads for SEGA, Taito, and Sofmap abound, while those unwilling to license their logos become targets for parody. But more than a mere façade, players can enter many of the storefronts, where they’ll find authentic J-pop melodies, popular sundries, as well as ladies in a variety of cosplay motifs. Save for the emaciated crowds and traffic, Undead & Undressed offers an unrivaled depiction of the legendary district.

Akiba’s Trip Undead & Undressed (3)

Of course, the game also exhibits a pugnaciousness and sense of peril that’s all but absent from the real-life Akiba. The game’s introductory cinematic finds the game’s protagonist strapped to table, awakened after an illicit medical procure has been performed. After responding to a help wanted ad that promised to pay in rare figurines, the character unintentionally signed a Faustian contract, transforming him into a Synthister. Much like vampires, these beings appear to be normal humans, and trade superhuman strength for a vulnerability to sunlight. But before any orders are issued, a woman named Shizuku Tokikaze liberates the lead, hinting at the motives of your malicious captors.

Soon the story moves to the headquarters of the MOGRA Freedom Fighters, a rag-tag group of volunteers committed to upholding the wellbeing of Akihabara’s patrons. It’s hear where you’ll meet Undead & Undressed’s cast of supporting characters. Although many of Freedom Fighters converge on trope, offering personalities that range from an air-headed Finnish foreign exchange student to a protective father-figure, the game’s dialog is astoundingly witty. Pleasingly, players are given a bit of leeway in the direction of conversations, periodically able to choose a response from three selections. Although your relying don’t have much of an effect toward Akiba’s Trip’s middle hours, they do have an impact on the beginning and middle of the game. Be a bit too insouciant in your initial response and you’ll be ushered back to the title screen. Later, dialog decisions as well as rapport with your AI partner determine which of the nine endings you’ll see (as well as affecting your path in the branching plotline),  extending the potential for repeat playthroughs through a New Game+ option.

Akiba’s Trip Undead & Undressed (4)

Much like the Yakuza franchise, the highlight of Undead & Undressed’s campaign can be found its fisticuffs. But where the draw of the SEGA series was the myriad of everyday items players could employ as weapons, here it’s the lure of disrobing antagonists. But using the triangle, circle, and ‘X’ button, the protagonist can target the head, torso, and lower body of foes. Dish out enough damage to one of these areas, and the region will flash red, indicating the possibility of a finisher. By holding down one of the corresponding buttons, players can then remove an article of clothing. If they’re pummeled other adjacent foes, then it’s possible that additional prompts will appear on screen, allowing gamers to string together wardrobe wrenching combos.

Platform Comparison
While the absence of a cross-buy option for Undead & Undressed is understandable, the inability to share save files between the PlayStation 3 and PS Vita versions is less comprehensible. While both versions target a thirty frame-per second output, each iterations succumbs to the sporadic instance of slowdown when combat gets too busy. On the whole, the Vita version (which also offers AF functionality with the gyroscopic ability of the system) offers a framerate that’s slightly steadier, as well as slightly quicker load and save times. The obvious advantage to the PS3 iteration is text size; even on a humble 37” LCD, portraits and background images offer greater fidelity and the san-serif fonts in dialog boxes are easier to read.

Although the foundations of fighting are well implemented, some of the game’s nuances aren’t as well realized. Although Undead & Undressed offers possibilities like Counters and Indefensible attacks, these optional strikes aren’t easy to pull off, with fussy timing leading to missed strikes and damage from foes. Likewise, blocking isn’t instantaneous, making it easier to temporarily retract from combat and hold the “L1” button to adjust your clothes. This way, it becomes harder for enemies to strip the player of his attire. Fortunately, you’re not alone in your endeavor, with Akiba’s Trip offering a choice of functional companions who can be given general orders via the directional pad.

Akiba’s Trip Undead & Undressed (5)

While combat does reinforce button-mashing, the payoff of removing articles of clothing helps to detract from most of the game’s mechanical deficiencies. Interestingly, Undead & Undressed’s stripping isn’t regulated to the female Synthisters, males get an equal opportunity to become disrobed during the game’s core campaign missions and side quests. It also helps that the game offers a myriad to offensive tools and outfits for the protagonist to wear, which each selection ushering in statistical as well as cosmetic changes.

Performance wise, both iterations of Akiba’s Trip suffer from frequent load screens, making traversal though Akihabara an arrhythmic adventure. Fortunately, bringing up the map screen offers an option for fast travel, but even that option is encumbered as new data is spooled in. On the upside, Undead & Undressed localization is superior, offering capable voice-overs in both Japanese and English. In game text is translated well, with a number of sly references that stateside otaku will surely identify.

Akiba’s Trip Undead & Undressed (2)

‘Strip’ away Undead & Undressed’s fan-service element, and you’re still left with a madcap, engaging storyline as well as a competent combat system. As such, it’s an enjoyable game elevated by an outrageous concept and a fastidious recreation of one of Tokyo’s celebrated districts. Stateside otaku will likely find the prospect irresistible, while more mainstream gamers will likely be irked by a handful of niggling design issues.

Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed was played on the PS Vita and PlayStation 3 with review code provided by the publisher.

Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed
Platform: PlayStation 3 and PS Vita
Developer: Acquire
Publisher: XSEED Games (NA), NIS America (EU)
Release date: August 12th, 2014
Price: $39.99 Retail or Digital via PSN
Language(s): Japanese or English voice, Japanese or English text
When visitors come to Los Angeles for the first time, their expectations of the city are often influenced by media. Quite often, they’ll are a bit surprised that the town doesn’t offer a non-stop cavalcade of exotic sports cars and celebrities, mixed in with the occasional outburst of gang warfare. Similarly, recent release Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed paints a fantastic portrait of Tokyo’s Akihabara district. Coming into prominence as the capital’s post-war hub for consumer electronics, “Electric Town” has more recently transformed into a must-visit mecca for otaku, offering a labyrinthine network of game, manga, and anime stores. Much…

Review Overview

Gameplay - 80%
Control - 75%
Aesthetics - 75%
Content - 80%
Accessibility - 80%

78%

Good

Summary : Sure the lack of cross-save capability might feel like a swindle, but Akiba’s Trip: Undead & Undressed main rip-off is the removal of antagonist apparel. For many, that will be a very good thing.

User Rating: 3.86 ( 5 votes)

About Robert Allen

With over 35 years of gaming experience, Robert 'DesertEagle' Allen is Tech-Gaming's resident worrier/warrior who spends his days teaching at three colleges and his nights devoted to JRPGs.

30 comments

  1. Wow, Robert coming through on launch day with a platform comparison. NICE!

  2. Whoa, a Prinny is in the game? Is that a weapon, DLC, or what?

    Please explain. Otherwise great review.

  3. I was soooo close to pulling the trigger on this. First drop below $40 and it’s mine now.

    Good review. Keep the love for Japan going!

  4. Broke the “lolis get a 85 and up rule” again.

    Read three reviews for the game and this was the best one. Of course one guy spelled PlayStation wrong. So there’s that.

    • That’s been dead for a while. Time to get it going again Robert before we accuse you of not liking lolis.

  5. This sounds like the type of game you play so you can keep your virginity well into your 30s.

  6. I have to ask…do they get fully nude?

    • No. Quick glimpses of bras and panties is as good as it gets. When they’re completely nude they cover it with white light so it looks like a bikini.

  7. I’m about two hours in and really like the game. Block works for me, in fact I relay on it. Other that that good review.

  8. Good review. Torn between the two versions.

  9. Finally a REAL review of the game.

    I read a site called Attack of the Fanboy and don’t know if it’s a joke review or the guy didn’t even play the game.

    He called the game a “JRPG”. Sure there’s leveling up but most same people would put in in the beat ’em up camp.

    Writing style is pure brain diarrhea, ex: “Japanese RPG’s are known to be unique and interesting for RPG fans and known to offer different gameplay that goes off the beaten path, however Akiba’s Trip is crazy as it not only has the story focus on demonic vampire-like creatures but also the means for defeating them is reduced to beating them to a pulp and removing their clothing. Yes, that is right.”

    “Players will be caught off guard at the interesting subject matter and the Mature rating off the franchise despite the normally T-rated JRPG scene.”

    And my favorite “Also considering the game is based on a real life Japanese town/city of Akihabara, there are over one-hundred and thirty (130) real-life shops that the player are able to visit during their adventure.”

    Someone tell the kid that Akiba is not a city or a town.

  10. Then there’s this guy that gave the game a 0/10: http://paulsemel.com/akibas-trip-undead-and-undressed-review/

    “In Akiba’s Trip: Undead And Undressed, your main goal is to tear people’s clothes off. But while this is done under the guise that you’re destroying bad, vampire-like super humans, let’s not kid ourselves: this is a game about sexually assaulting people. Which is why I, in good conscience, cannot recommend anyone buy this game.

    That it’s also a bad game is just the icing on the cake. A gross, gross cake.”

    Social Justice Warriors mount up!

    • So violence is ok. We can shoot, kill, and watch them bleed out, but ripping off clothes is horrible.

      Help me understand.

    • The guy brings up a valid point. The idea is pretty twisted and seems to play into some sort of power fetish. That’s a dangerous think to promote. It’s not funny or sexy, just off.

      • didn’t play, but honestly when I saw the gameplay the stripping looked goofy and comedic rather than sexual

        • Yeah, I felt the same. I think it’s also important that it’s not just women, you’re stripping guys as well.

    • Lame.

      0/10 means the game is unplayable. Leave the politics outside of a review.

  11. I’m happy you don’t play the SJW game. Good review.

  12. You didn’t mention how wonky the camera is. It does a pretty bad job at framing the action.

  13. What a shitty review for a stupid game. Why do all the Japanese games have to look the same?

  14. That such an awful idea for a game. I mean your ripping people clothes off in public. What the hell is wrong with the makers of the game and what’s wrong with you for not speaking up and saying how this is half a step away from rape?

  15. Wow that’s a stretch. Help me understand the concept between ripping clothes and rape.

    • The problem is that people take things too seriously. Some people think shaming ideas and stopping games from these kinds of mechanics will make people less violent.

      Guess what? This game comes from Japan where the crime rates are much lower.

  16. Found a retail copy today. Yeah!