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Moero Chronicle Hyper review

2014’s Monster Monpiece garnered attention when publisher Idea Factory International was obligated to omit eighteen card images for the stateside and European releases. While some rancorously objected to the edits, this was a necessary evil, as console software licensing has a tradition of prudency. As such, it wasn’t surprising when the next game in the Genkai Totsuki series, Moero Chronicle, wasn’t identified for localization aboard. But with Steam’s independence from the ESRB’s rating system, Moero eventually made its way onto PC.

Nearly two years later, the game has been ported onto the Switch, with just enough improvements to justify the addition of “Hyper” to its moniker. Luckily, none of the naughtiness has been discarded in the transition. When it comes to sexy subject matter, this is the same as the Steam version.

For Fans of Fan Service

Given developer Compile Heart’s persistent fondness for fan-service, the lead character’s standpoint should probably pretty relatable for the publisher’s followers. A quick prologue introduces players to protagonist Io, as he’s caught in the middle of a bout of male dissonance. After being called a pervert as a prepubescent, Io struggles with the enticement of females. To make matters worse, the incident weighs on his interactions with women, turning simple small talk into awkward affairs.

Given the lead’s general laziness and initial indifference toward any type of actualization, it would seem as if Compile Heart are trying to set up the lead to challenge otaku stereotype. But for far too long in Moero Chronicle, Io borders on the wretched, persistently whining and lacking any intention to contribute to the community around him. As such, it’s hard not to identify a dialectic at play. Compile Heart’s fans probably share Io’s lascivious nature and will likely be amused by the game’s combat system, which is built around a metaphor for ejaculation. But there’s also a moralistic tone, as if the developer wants players to experience something more than mere lust in their own lives.

Otton, a Seal of Good Taste

Which might seem slightly odd for a thirty+ hour dungeon crawl that centers around collecting monster girls by petting and poking them. To a lesser extent, the game’s focus on a human village surrounded by outposts of monster girls gone mad is just enough impetus to drive the action. But some players might want a bit more substance from the proceedings. On the upside, there are some amusing interactions between Io, and his childhood friend, a monster girl named Lilia. Additional levity stems from the inclusion of Otton, a pink seal with a serious panty fetish.

Beyond visual novel-style interludes between Chronicle’s characters, a significant portion of playtime will be spend reconnoitering the game’s labyrinths. Here, the game recalls the Etrian Odyssey series, save for the requirement for cartography. Instead, Moero fills in the on-screen map as you move down corridors and discover the occasional treasure chest. Naturally, there are switches that needs to be triggered to access new areas and save point that need to be located so you can preserve your progress.

Building Up to an Exciting Climax

Combat is frequent and quite often unexpected, as stepping on a grid title throws a throng of enemies at the adventuring party. Skirmishing with basic enemies is rooted in DRPG tradition, as players take turns trading blows with a selection of imaginative beasts, guided by a turn order indicator at the top of the screen. As mentioned, Moero Chronicle’s battle system centers around maximizing excitement, with turns dedicated to accumulating ‘desire’, and ‘releasing’ it to power-up your monster girls. Much like life, allowing your desire gauge to overflow can lead to a humiliating and even precarious situation, where you face an extended ‘calm time’ which enfeebles any attacks. Save for a color-based affinity system applies to auras, combat shirks complication, ensuring Chronicle remains accessible. And with four different difficulty settings and a challenge level that leans toward the painless, the game can accommodate even recreational adventurers.

That said, the fights against the monster girls are one of the title’s showpieces and are a bit more taxing. Here, you are required you target different pieces of clothing for each beastly beauty, and once the hit points for say a skirt or shirt, the whole thing explodes ceremoniously, producing moans and squeals from the girls. The goal is more than merely confronting modesty, as getting them to strip down to sexy undergarments eventually results in a rubbing mini-game that recalls Monster Monpiece’s masturbatory moveset. Yes, you’ll find, pet, and poke erogenous zones until the mon-girl peaks with passion, ultimately becoming part of your team. And while it all sounds completely carnal, there’s no actual nudity, making Chronicle more comical than sexy.

Looks Good and Plays Well on Switch

Pleasingly, the Switch iteration demonstrates none of the frustrating issues that plagued the original Steam release. Across twenty hours of play, the game’s main problem is the quality of the translations. While there are none of the obviousness typos that curse localization, dialog is often awkwardly phrased. Fortunately, the game’s visual output fares better, flaunting a respectable fidelity is both docked and handheld mode. The title scales its assets proficiently, with its compendium of mon-girls filling the screen with wonderous, jiggling beauty.

It’s gratifying to see a risqué romp like Moero Chronicle Hyper localized with any bowdlerizing edits, especially at a price that doesn’t exploit niche enthusiasts. Although Chronicle isn’t revolutionary, it is an enjoyable, relaxed dungeon crawl with a heaping supply of sexiness. With Compile Heart reminding us to keep our libidos in balance, I’d advise the same for expectations.

Moero Chronicle Hyper was played on the Switch
with review code provided by the publisher

2014’s Monster Monpiece garnered attention when publisher Idea Factory International was obligated to omit eighteen card images for the stateside and European releases. While some rancorously objected to the edits, this was a necessary evil, as console software licensing has a tradition of prudency. As such, it wasn’t surprising when the next game in the Genkai Totsuki series, Moero Chronicle, wasn’t identified for localization aboard. But with Steam’s independence from the ESRB’s rating system, Moero eventually made its way onto PC. Nearly two years later, the game has been ported onto the Switch, with just enough improvements to justify the addition of “Hyper” to its moniker.…

Review Overview

Gameplay - 75%
Story - 75%
Aesthetics - 80%
Content - 80%
Accessibility - 80%
Performance - 80%

78%

GOOD

Summary : If dungeon crawling through a maze of monster-girl filled halls sounds like fun, Moero Chronicle Hyper delivers with plenty of playful puckishness on hand. A twenty-dollar price point is a welcome incentive.

User Rating: 4.45 ( 2 votes)

About Robert Allen

With over 35 years of gaming experience, Robert 'DesertEagle' Allen is Tech-Gaming's resident worrier/warrior who spends his days teaching at three colleges and his nights devoted to JRPGs.

9 comments

  1. I picked this up on the day of release. It’s not the best dungeon crawler ever but it’s pretty damn funny.

  2. Good review. I think I’ll get it. Is there a physical version or is it just digital?

  3. Thanks for the review. I didn’t know this had come to Switch and unedited at that.

  4. Going to see this tomorrow. Thanks for the review.

  5. So you get to pet the monster girls? That’s not something I’d do in public.

  6. Great review. I have you guys on my RSS feed now.

  7. Hows the music? Also, I can’t seem to find the name of the opening and ending themes. Do you know the names?

  8. Thank you! Looked all over.