The Latest

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends review

Bubble Dragons Bub and Bob are back with serviceable sequel that won’t burst your bubble but won’t bowl you over with creativity, either. 

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends
Platform: Switch
Developer: Taito Corporation
Publisher: ININ Games
Release date: March 26th, 2020
Availability: $39.99 via digital download from the eShop

Few games have a legacy as enduring as Bubble Bobble. Originally released by Taito in 1986, the title quickly became a hit in arcades. Two years later, a competent NES port emerged, securing the game’s bubble-blowing, achingly cute dragons a perpetual place in popular culture. Explore some of the alcoves of contemporary Akihabara, and you’ll discover Bub and Bob plushies in Super Potato, MacBook Airs adorned with stickers of the plucky pair, and if you’re lucky- an original arcade machine imbued with Seven Stars’ smoke.

But despite Bub and Bob’s enduring fame, Bubble Bobble has struggled to develop as a franchise. Although creator Fukio Mitsuji would go onto to create the equally enjoyable Rainbow Islands: The Story of Bubble Bobble 2, an inclination to peruse other genres (Syvalion, Volfied) and a tragic passing in 2008 put the series in less capable hands. At best, subsequent sequels like Bubble Bobble Plus!/ Bubble Bobble Neo! were innocuous retreads. But titles like Bubble Bobble Revolution and Bubble Bobble Evolution were disappointing enough to drag down the dragons’ reputation. The former was released with an infamous bug that prohibited advancement after the thirtieth stage, securing a place in the gaming hall of shame.

Bub and Bob Boosted by Intuitive Controls

Although the recent Switch release of Bubble Bobble 4 Friends might not revolutionize things, it also doesn’t mar the series’ trademark accessibility. Step into the game’s first succession of fifty stages and you’ll encounter the same intuitive control scheme.  You’ll still move your adorable little dragon back and forth, traversing to higher platforms with a press of the jump button. While stages frequently emit bubbles, you can also launch your own, which are used to temporarily trap enemies until you can pop the delicate spheres.

Bursting these orbs still releases dividends that augment your score, with peaches, chocolate covered bananas, diamonds, and crown scattering around the screen. If you’re able to successfully eliminate several enemies, you’ll get more luxurious rewards, some of which swell to massive proportions. Who doesn’t love gorging on grape-capped cupcake that is three times your height? Another collectable are balloons with the letters E-X-T-E-N-D. Not only do these provide extra lives, but also unlock new skills.

Prudently Applied Alterations

Changes that affect gameplay are subtle. In the original game, you could occasionally skim across the surface of a bubble without popping it. With Bubble Bobble 4 Friends you’ll frequently ride the globes to access different areas of the stage. Pressing down while falling activates a dragon stomp, making it easy to a pop a column of bubbles. Touching an enemy or anything launched from a boss will confiscate one of your lives.

Undoubtedly, the biggest addition is the addition of local multiplayer that supports up to a quartet of budding bubble blowers. Here, a pool of lives is communally shared, and if you aren’t able to rescue a injured ally, you’ll have to draw from the fund. As one of the endings of the original Bubble Bobble suggested, this is a game that should be played with a partner. But when a third or fourth companion joins, 4 Friends can get quite busy. Sure, the levels are larger thanks to the Switch’s widescreen ratio. And the game’s framerate never falters even when it’s filled with foes and bubbles. But occasionally, it can difficult keeping track of what’s going on, especially when playing in portable mode. On the upside, the first campaign is rather kid friendly. If you’re not able to pass a stage in three attempts, 4 Friends offers invulnerability, which is a compassionate inclusion.

Bland Boss Battles

But there a few issues that when coupled with the game’s premium price, might cause hesitation. Boss battles are one of the game’s sticking points. Although it’s easy to blow through a sequence of stages without losing a life, these showdowns require a different set of strategies, lest you’re empty out your life reserves. These confrontations aren’t especially tough, but the likelihood for a single misstep is much higher. Another issue is that save for the last confrontation, most of the boss designs are uninteresting.

Complete the game’s fifty-level trek and you’ll be goaded into tackling it a second time, albeit with remixed stages. It’s an amiable addition, but I suspect players would have rather seen a new set of level rather than the same ones with more monsters.  At least the developers included the original arcade version of Bubble Bobble, allowing for comparison. Contrast the two and you’ll find that Bubble Bobble 4 Friends remains the enjoyment but adds very little to the formula.

Bubble Bobble 4 Friends was played on Switch with review code provided by the publisher 

 

Bubble Dragons Bub and Bob are back with serviceable sequel that won’t burst your bubble but won't bowl you over with creativity, either.  Few games have a legacy as enduring as Bubble Bobble. Originally released by Taito in 1986, the title quickly became a hit in arcades. Two years later, a competent NES port emerged, securing the game’s bubble-blowing, achingly cute dragons a perpetual place in popular culture. Explore some of the…

Review Overview

Gameplay - 80%
Controls - 85%
Aesthetics - 80%
Content - 70%
Accessibility - 75%
Performance - 85%

79%

GOOD

Summary : Small details like Taito references in the backdrop demonstrate that the developers did their homework with Bubble Bobble 4 Friends. But few creative liberties and a lofty price point make this a trek for only dedicated bubble dragon fans.

User Rating: 4.55 ( 2 votes)

About Robert Allen

With over 35 years of gaming experience, Robert 'DesertEagle' Allen is Tech-Gaming's resident worrier/warrior who spends his days teaching at three colleges and his nights devoted to JRPGs.

6 comments

  1. I thought this was a $20 game from watching videos. $40 is asking too much.

  2. Does Taito officially exist anymore? I thought they were part of Square-Enix now.

    • They got purchase by SE but exist independently within the corporation. I’m sure they still bring in that sweet pachinko money over in Japan.

  3. “Explore some of the alcoves of contemporary Akihabara, and you’ll discover Bub and Bob plushies in Super Potato, MacBook Airs adorned with stickers of the plucky pair, and if you’re lucky- an original arcade machine imbued with Seven Stars’ smoke.”

    A man of culture right there.

  4. I never noticed Bub and Bob save the same hands and feet. Also, aren’t they dinosaurs? Why am I not up on the lore?

  5. Sounds fun. Just waiting for a price drop. $40 seems pretty expensive.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.