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Monster Monpiece Review

Monster Monpiece (2)
Periodically, it seems developers enjoy putting players in embarrassing situations. From Feel the Magic: XY/XX’s simulated CPR, which prompted gamers to blow into their DS microphones to No More Heroes’ beam katana recharges that forced us to jerk our Wiimotes and Move controllers in a suggestive manner, we’ve been asked to perform some pretty awkward acts. Undoubtedly, the recent release of Monster Monpiece for the PS Vita will be remembered as the game that encouraged a bit of simulated self-pleasure in public. Certainly, for snobbish players this obligation will undoubtedly be a deal breaker. But for those who can glean humor in this silly and unapologetically sophomoric leveling up system, Monpiece proves to be an engaging card battler as well as a fountainhead of indulging fan-service.

A perfunctory scrolling text-based sequence expresses the game’s backstory, articulating a shifting tide of tensions between mankind and monster in a realm called Yafaniel. Long ago, humanity’s ruthless dominance was punished by the release of monsters into the world. When these beasts began committing atrocities of their own, they were castigated and forced to live in the bodies of humans, thus limiting their powers and sowing the seed for an alliance between the two factions. Realizing the potential for a symbiotic relationship, academies began to emerge, where humans learned to utilize the abilities of beasts through card-based battles.

Monster Monpiece (4)
The game’s plotline extends a quartet of likable principals, with character development and exposition handed through mercifully germane and adeptly localized dialog sequences. Within the first half-hour the game reveals the substance of its storyline- which involves the self-actualization of a second-guessing character as well as another protagonist becoming cursed, thereby endangering Yafaniel‘s fragile balance. While the plotline’s trajectory is fairly predictable, that decision proves to be beneficial, allowing gamers to devote their attention to Monpiece’s combat component.

Moving along an overworld map of networked nodes, players encounter locations which bestow currency, cards, conversation, or combat. The latter transports gamers to a seven by three grid, with ally and enemy bases located on opposing peripheries. Drawing from a mana pool, each opponent takes turns placing monster cards on their section of the battlefield, with their selection transforming into four types of characters: melee, ranged, healer, and buffer units. Naturally, sword swinging melee characters have strong attacks against an enemies in an adjacent square, while ranged units carry bows which allow them to pierce outlying opponents. Meanwhile, healers and buffers function as supportive units, restoring health or improving the power of attacking characters directly in front of them. Remarkably, units aren’t locked into a singular position on the grid, and if there’s no enemy in front of them- they’ll advance toward their rival’s headquarters. Allowing a unit to reach the enemy endzone deducts hit points- and enough are HP are removed, the owner of the besieged base loses the match.

Monster Monpiece (3)
Wisely, Monster Monpiece doesn’t frontload explanations of additional mechanics, favoring a slow tickle of instruction. Gradually, players will discover many new nuances, from the ability to fuse together two of the same units into a statistical powerhouse to bonuses bestowed by laying down a succession of multiple cards of the same color. While Monpiece forsakes the customary non-character boost or burn cards, the game does provide nuance in two types of unit skills as well as customizable item usage. Largely, the title does a great job at educating the player without having to sift through a torrent of tutorial screens. Likewise, the game’s learning curve is especially generous, leisurely increasing the level of challenge so players won’t collide into an impenetrable wall of challenge. For gamers who’d prefer to confront online contestants, Monpiece offers an online component to determine the effectiveness of your deck building and strategic approaches.

Whether enjoying the lengthy single-player campaign or facing opponents online, constructing an effective collection of cards is undeniably advantageous. Pleasingly, customization imposes only three limitations: your deck must have between thirty and forty cards, can have no more than three of the same units and must have no more than three rare-ranked cards. Mirroring combat, players can use either the touch screen or directional-pad (strangely, the analog stick is limited to map navigation) to assemble their deck, while the intuitive interface allows for straightforward grouping and sorting options. Thoughtfully, gamers can built, name, and tweak a number of separate decks, allowing for a multitude of strategic approaches.

Monster Monpiece (5)
Once players enter the game’s second chapter, they become privy to First Crush Rub. Here players can increase the stats of any of the cards by paying a premium of in-game currency (compassionately, Monpiece shirks any in-app purchases). Once a card is selected and the proper price is paid, a timer gives gamers a limited amount of time to increase a tension gauge. Stroking, tapping, and pinching in certain erogenous zones (using both front- and backtouch) issues an eruption of hearts, stars, as well as orgasmic utterances, elevating the meter. Successfully locating and lavishing the amorous areas can summon Otton the self-proclaimed “wandering panty hunter” Seal of Monpiece sequel Moero Chronicle for a mode referred to as Extreme Love mode, where the gauge’s summit can be reached faster. Reaching this apex not only increases a card’s base stats, but has the side effect of removing a few articles of clothing. Solitary gamers would be aware that some cards require a seal stone to rub, which can only be optioned through ad-hoc or online battles.

In execution, First Crush Rub requires some vigorous stroking, making the mode a bit unsuitable for public play. Fortunately, Monster Monpiece never forces to play the mini-game at a specific time, meaning you can rub away in the confines on your own home. For those absolutely opposed to the idea of stroking their system, there is a power-up which allows players to power-up without tarnishing their touchscreen.

Monster Monpiece (6)
Compile Heart’s console offerings are often plagued with graphics hitches, such as low-resolution textures and sluggish framerates. Thankfully, Monster Monpiece reveals few of those snags, save for a tiny bit of lag amidst the end game explosion. When displaying 3D models on the PS Vita’s screen, the game is competent- but the visual quickly elevate into risqué elegance once the title’s card portraits are displayed. From a maiden/monster who gradually steps out of her the confines of her kappa costume, an captivatingly cute antgirl, several shimapan showing characters, and even cameos from Compile’s other titles, the game is nothing short of a visual feast, exhibiting the prowess of a number of Japanese artists. Although Monpiece’s sonic palette isn’t quite as prodigious, the game does provide a span breadth of ear-pleasing musical styles.

Monster Monpiece’s signature mechanic is a double-edged sword. On one hand, it’s poised to provide the game with a great deal of attention, few games have you stroking lolis until their clothes come off. Alternatively, the hook isn’t really representative of the other ninety percent of the game, which is an otherwise innocuous collectible card battle game fueled by a contenting storyline. Chances are, most otaku will be delighted by Monpiece’s premise, making this quirk title an easy recommendation.

Monster Monpiece (1)
Monster Monpiece was played on the PS Vita with review code provided by the publisher.

Periodically, it seems developers enjoy putting players in embarrassing situations. From Feel the Magic: XY/XX’s simulated CPR, which prompted gamers to blow into their DS microphones to No More Heroes’ beam katana recharges that forced us to jerk our Wiimotes and Move controllers in a suggestive manner, we’ve been asked to perform some pretty awkward acts. Undoubtedly, the recent release of Monster Monpiece for the PS Vita will be remembered as the game that encouraged a bit of simulated self-pleasure in public. Certainly, for snobbish players this obligation will undoubtedly be a deal breaker. But for those who can glean…

Review Overview

Gameplay - 80%
Story - 75%
Aesthetics - 90%
Content - 90%
Accessibility - 85%

84%

Very Good

Summary : If the idea of Magic the Gathering outfitted with a lavish quantity of moé sounds good, you’ll want to pick up Monster Monpiece immediately. Although hardly revolutionary, the game’s impish charms and solid mechanics are bound rub fan-service enthusiasts just the right way.

User Rating: 4.2 ( 3 votes)

About Robert Allen

With over 35 years of gaming experience, Robert 'DesertEagle' Allen is Tech-Gaming's resident worrier/warrior who spends his days teaching at three colleges and his nights devoted to JRPGs.

30 comments

  1. ” For those absolutely opposed to the idea of stroking their system, there is a power-up which allows players to power-up without tarnishing their touchscreen.”

    You dirty dog you! LOL when I read that.

  2. Great review, but I expect a shitstorm for standing up for fan-service. Better watch your back at E3, Anita Sarkeesian might try to shank you, dood.

  3. Notice: 2 Kleenex boxes were used in the review of this game. 😉

    Seriously tho. Great review. Glad to see someone who understands Japanese games writing quality reviews. #Realtalk

  4. Don’t forget that Mario Kart DS made you blow up the balloons by blowing into the mic. Select was so much slower. That was kind of embarrassing.

  5. I need a screen protector before playing this.

    In case there’s a little dirt on my finger and I might scratch the screen.

  6. “Lolis get a 85 and up” rule broken by one damn point. You need to fix that.

    • This review is a joke right? This game gets a 84/100? It sounds like it’s a child molester test.

      It also sounds like you failed, bro.

  7. Good review. I was curious about this one after first reading about it.

  8. Pretty good review. Need to make a video of rubbing one out.

  9. This looks like a game that would appeal to a Madonna or Lady Gaga fan.

    What’s your favorite?

    • Is that a joke? Not that funny if you are trying to be humorous.

      Glad to see a Japanese game doing something besides “fight, spell, item, flee” menus. I’m pretty much over those.

    • Ok, I’ll bite. Madonna’s “Ray of Light”. I was indifferent toward Lady Gaga until the announcement that Hatsune Miku would be opening for her.

  10. Wow, this game sounds absolutely cat-shit crazy. So much so that I feel like I need to play it.

    Also: It this the one that was censored? What exactly was taken out?

    • About 40 out of 350 or so cards were taken out. The stat bonuses were left in. There’s still PLENTY of fan-service left in however.

      https://www.facebook.com/notes/idea-factory-international-inc/regarding-monster-monpiece-censorship/1512665578958883

      Idea Factory International is fully aware of the concerns expressed by fans, so we would like to inform everyone about the censored images in greater detail.
      Monster Monpiece is a card battle game, in which players summon various “Monster Girls” onto the game’s battlefields and then fight their opponents. These cards—meaning the “Monster Girls”—are able to be powered up by exposing themselves (taking off their clothes) via the level-up features called First Crush Rub and Extreme Love. We kept the same number of cards in the game as the original Japanese version, but replaced some of the higher level Monster Girl images with the “less exposed” lower level versions of the corresponding Monster Girls due to some intense sexual imagery. The number of censored cards is about 40 out of the approximately 350 card images available in the game. This means that over 300 cards are left untouched from the original images. That said, each card that has had its image removed will still have the same number of levels for the player to increase, but the higher level card images will be the same as the lower level, even though they have leveled up and have become more powerful. We would like to emphasize that the game’s playtime, the game’s system, and the game’s features are all the same as the original Japanese release, and players can level up their Monster Girls to the highest levels as well, again, matching the Japanese release.
      This was a very difficult decision since we work very hard to satisfy our fans and want to bring the same content being offered in Japan.However, Western society is not as lenient as that of Japan when sexual images are involved—especially images of humanoids that appear to be younger than a socially acceptable age. The borderline of what is “acceptable” will always be extremely gray and vary from person to person, but as a responsible company working in the U.S., we had to make the difficult decision that we did. We sincerely apologize for those who do not agree with any level of censorship, but we greatly appreciate your understanding with the decision we have made.

      About the rating differences between North America (ESRB, Mature) and Europe (PEGI, 12):
      The reason for the difference in these ratings is simply the difference in the rating system between ESRB and PEGI. We received a Mature rating for Monster Monpiece from the ESRB with the censored material we submitted.However, for PEGI, and with the same material assets for their review, they rated it 12+ because of the minimal amount of violence shown in the game. We appreciate your understanding with these rating differences.

      Idea Factory International, Inc.

      • I would have rather then insert ages onto the cards telling people that they’re ages are like 21, 22, (or 342 if they are monsters) than to have got rid of the cards.

  11. “From a maiden/monster who gradually steps out of her the confines of her kappa costume, an captivatingly cute antgirl, several shimapan showing characters, and even cameos from Compile’s other titles, the game is nothing short of a visual feast”

    Oh, good god stop already. I’m getting the game. No need to pander like that.

    • You should do a pantsu review- with 1-5 panties to rate games!

      Give credit to the Lord though. hahaha

  12. I expected a lot more ‘deck’ jokes. ☆

  13. Buying this and Idea Factory International if you’re reading this, please bring over Moero Chronicle and Fairy Fencer F! I’d buy them both day one!

  14. So how nasty do the cards get? I need to know for ah, journalistic purposes.

  15. Here’s what’s missing: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-bZBYZ0dNlgE/U1pws_JSH4I/AAAAAAAAAvs/enOFFlLPqbQ/s1600/monstermonpiececards.png

    (NSFW)

    No way could they release that in the US.

  16. Thinking about getting this today since I have $10 of PSN credit. Did they make a retail edition? I dont like filling space on my memory card.

  17. Youve become my number one source for Japanese game reviews. Good work.

  18. How is J-List not an official advertiser of Tech-Gaming?

  19. The reviewer was obviously bought out by Idea Factory, not even mentioning his article how the game was butchered of a large chunk of content. Worse than SJW journalists.

    • Dude, so you rather read some white guy tell us that playing Japanese game make us bad men?

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