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Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online (PC) review

Amidst most of the twentieth century, the term, ‘simulacra’ typically implied inferiority. A painting based on a photograph was separated from its source material by two degrees, and subsequently would lose some of its essence across the series of two adaptions. But as anyone who has played an over-the-top sports games like Hot Shots Golf or NBA Jam knows, recreations that don’t obediently strive for authenticity can be a hell of a lot of fun. In the digital age, simulation might be better than the real thing, offering players the ability to execute a succession of eagles or slam dunks.

This kind of spirited reproduction is at the heart of the recent PC release of Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online, a proficient port of last October’s PlayStation 4 title. The Tamsoft-developed effort imagines Compile Heart’s cherished quartet of anthropomorphic consoles playing one of the ersatz games the series sporadically references. Functionally, it’s primarily a single-player experience aiming to recreate the experience of a massively multiplayer online game. But it’s execution, it’s a rollicking romp that shatters the fourth wall with gleeful abandon. Parody-centered games are only as good as their core play mechanics. Pleasingly, 4 Goddesses is steadily competent, destined to delight fans of the Neptunia IP.

On the surface, Cyberdimension’s plot-within-a-plot seems rooted in the most formulaic cliché. Dialog establishes an enchanted realm called Alsgard, formed by a foursome of suspiciously reminiscent deities, highlighted by a magical tree reminiscent in form and function to Yggdrasil. Unsurprisingly, the great tree is challenged by a nefarious interloper, and the obligatory fragments needed to combat such evil are spread across the world, thus covering all of the fundamentals for an old-fashioned adventure.

But what makes 4 Goddesses Online work is the concept that Neptune, Blanc, Noire and Vert are exploring Alsgard through a MMO that’s still in beta, permitting the Console Patron Units plenty of opportunities to skewer gaming convention. Cleverly, they’re even aware of ‘players’ on the other side of the screen, occasionally remarking at the mysterious onlookers, and helping to solidify the sensation of a game within a game. Another opportunity for entertainment stems from the shifting of adventure classes, ensuring opportunities for uneasiness as each lead must adapt to her new role.

Like any Neptunia title, humor is rooted in a slavish devotion to fan-service. Whether it’s the abundance of Vert’s bosom or the franchise’s resident pettanko, there’s the predictable amount of puckish dialog. But what makes 4 Goddesses Online so amusing is the self-awareness of the CPUs. It’s one thing to grin at the deliberately low-slung camera, but it’s quite another to hear the girls acknowledge it and sheepishly concede series convention. This kind of cognizance makes Nep-Nep and the girls feel remarkably life-like, and it’s going to be interesting to see if Neptunia’s narrative will be able to return to its oblivious roots.

Although a playful conscious dominates the storyline, Cyberdimension is intent on letting its mechanics mimic MMO tenet. Largely, combat is competent, with the girls pummeling recognizable Neptunia opponents with real-time based attacks. There’s the requisite combos, guards, and with a bit of precise timing, a parry to confront adjacent foes. An arsenal of range-based attacks are easily dispensed, whether players are using a mouse and keyboard or a controller. Mirroring the ambiance of many massively multiplayer games, players won’t be surveying the screen for hit boxes or targetable body parts. Even when using the game’s lock-on system, it’s more prudent to flail away at enemies, as you vigilantly monitor your health meter for the occasional replenishment.

Some of this stems from 4 Goddesses’ artificial intelligence, which can be a bit uneven. Although each CPU adheres to her team role and confronts nearby creatures, pathfinding is uneven, resulting in the girls frequently teleporting to your location. Currently, there are a few anomalies present that affect online play. One of the oddest ones emerges when a host is killed, which can drop the remaining party member from the game, instead of switching duties to another player.

But if you do decide to play solo, know that the individual game deemphasizes the synergy between classes. As such, the intensity of boss battles is muted, with little of the frantic energy that forces complete cooperation between party members. On the upside, you won’t have to face the little quirks of online matches, such as the rubber-banding of non-hosting participants, which can be a bit bothersome.

While 4 Goddesses Online’ combat is competent, the overarching incentive for progress could have used a boost of creativity. Sure, all the essential details are present and efficiently handled, with all town functions conducted through a scrolling-screen populated by chibi avatars. And while the girls make allusion to the rudimentary nature of guild jobs, where age-old pastimes like collection and killing dominate, the title still forces players to complete these straightforward assignments. On the upside, you can complete multiple objectives in a single run, which helps to make the title’s twenty-five hour play time avoid feeling too padded.

Visually, Cyberdimension’s utilization of the fourth iteration of the Unreal Engine allows for graphical opulence. Both the CPU units and Candidates look great, both in normal and HDD Form, moving with a new level of fluidity. While Neptunia games are often chastised for asset recycling, fans will be pleased to know that the game’s art has been redrawn, diminishing any sense of visual fatigue. On the downside, the game’s initial load time is a bit long and 2D Live is no longer used for dialog sequences. Without transitional facial expression and the customary jiggle, the cinematics aren’t as charming; fortunately, Idea Factory International’s localization is spot-on, capturing the mischievousness of the banter.  Credit should also be given to Erabareshi’s opening theme, “Picon de Metafiction” as well as Fuki’s closer, “Log Out Shinaide” which are some of the best music heard in the franchise to date.

Your average MMO aficionado isn’t going to praise Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online. Functionally, the game is a solid, but exhibits few of the qualities that mark an exceptional experience for groups of players. But the Nep Nation will undoubted adore Tamsoft’s self-referential storyline and how the CPUs are affectionately rendered. While previous titles have tried to endow the girls with personality, Cyberdimension Neptunia establishes a watermark that’s going to be difficult to top.

Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online was played on the
PC with review code provided by the publisher. 

Cyberdimension Neptunia: 4 Goddesses Online
Platform:
PC, previously on PlayStation 4
Developer:
Idea Factory, Compile Heart, and Tamsoft
Publisher: Idea Factory International
Release date: February 27th, 2018
Price: $39.99 via Steam, launch price of $27.99
Amidst most of the twentieth century, the term, ‘simulacra’ typically implied inferiority. A painting based on a photograph was separated from its source material by two degrees, and subsequently would lose some of its essence across the series of two adaptions. But as anyone who has played an over-the-top sports games like Hot Shots Golf or NBA Jam knows, recreations that don’t obediently strive for authenticity can be a hell of a lot of fun. In the digital age, simulation might be better than the real thing, offering players the ability to execute a succession of eagles or slam dunks. This kind of spirited reproduction is…

Review Overview

Gameplay - 80%
Controls - 80%
Aesthetics - 85%
Content - 80%
Accessibility - 85%
Innovation - 80%

82%

VERY GOOD

Summary : Step aside, .hack// and Sword Art Online, you've just been out-Nepped. Neptune, Blanc, Vert, Noire, and the girls bring the fictional MMO, 4 Goddesses Online, to life, delivering a faux-massively multiplayer experience ideal for individuals.

User Rating: 4.33 ( 9 votes)

About Robert Allen

With over 35 years of gaming experience, Robert 'DesertEagle' Allen is Tech-Gaming's resident worrier/warrior who spends his days teaching at three colleges and his nights devoted to JRPGs.

12 comments

  1. NBA Jam mentioned in a Neptunia review. You are a mad man, Robert. But also a great writer.

  2. I love the see-thru image in the last picture. If you looks closely you can see the shimapan.

    The price is right, just waiting to see if they fix any of the MP issues. Rubber-banding is not fun is a game.

  3. I played the PS4 version a while back. Seems like they did fix any of the issues for this port. Rubber bands and the lag in controls when playing online made it only fun offline.

    If you’re into that, then it’s worth it.

  4. I wish this was on Switch.

  5. How would this look on a laptop with a GTX 860?

  6. I soooo wanna get this!

  7. While you mentioned the multiplayer, and only talked about it negatively (which is appropriate). I feel you have substantially down-played the problems in it, and you have split up the facts about it in 2 places, making it difficult and confusing for people who are interested in this game for the multiplayer (as I was) to learn details about one of the main selling points of the game. If you just did a numbered list explaining some of the problems in it like.

    1. Being defeated in multiplayer groups will kick that player, if the host is defeated the room disbands and the mission fails.
    2. The game’s netcode feels as if client players are playing with a latency of 900 ping.
    3. When missions complete, the group disbands.
    4. After a initial loading screen lasting 2 minutes, there are 55 seconds (or so) of unskippable company logos. (this is not multiplayer related, but it’s still important to know).

    Doing this would do wonders to increase the readability and conciseness of the review, as well as make it clear to any would-be purchasers of these (In my opinion serious) problems in it.
    The publisher doesn’t make it clear that the multiplayer is like this, judging from an excerpt from the steam page:
    “Nep_Main Joined your Party – Play online with up to three other people for extra loot and harder enemies, plus use the in-game chat feature to really make it feel like an MMO! (It’s not.)”.
    Most will assume “common expectation” or slightly below that. That the netcode would be ok, that instead of being kicked, you enter into a spectator mode, that groups would stay together instead of separated, that despite it being “meh” friends will have fun with it.

    But it’s not, it’s FAR below common expectation, to such a point as to SHOCK AND enduce DISBELIEF. If multiplayer veterans saw this video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_5MskxWEUdo

    they too would feel as I do (shock and disbelief). Indeed it’s so terrible that the game stands unique in my personal memory of games, and possibly it may even STAND UNIQUE IN HISTORY for how TERRIBLE the MULTIPLAYER is. This may even be award winning levels of terrible (like how there are Oscars for the worst film).
    I don’t even think that’s an understatement, I may indeed be correct.
    If a game is this much lower than “common expectation” I think it would be an improvement, (and your duty) to emphasize it to the degree that it’s terrible.

    For my sake.
    For the sake of those who really look forward to the multiplayer.
    For the sake of some starry-eyed fan who with great anticipation wants to play this game with their friends or family and hopes to boot up the multiplayer to play with others, only to find that it’s awful beyond imagination.

    Imagine how they’ll feel.

    • All good points. But I feel most people are looking for a single-player games that’s like an MMO and not a real MP game.

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